A World War II RAF Pilot Is Reminiscing Before School Children About His Days In The Air Force

A World War II RAF Pilot Is Reminiscing Before School Children About His Days In The Air Force

A World War II Royal Air Force pilot is reminiscing before school children about his days in the air force. “In 1942,” he says, “the situation was really tough. The Germans had a very strong air force. I remember, ” he continues, “one day I was protecting the bombers and suddenly, out of the clouds, these fokkers appeared. (At this point, several of the children giggle.) “I looked up, and right above me was one of them. I aimed at him and shot him down. They were swarming. I immediately…

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Have You Not Been To Frankfurt Before?

Have You Not Been To Frankfurt Before?

The German air controllers at Frankfurt Airport are renowned as a short-tempered lot. They not only expect one to know one’s gate parking location, but how to get there without any assistance from them. So it was with some amusement that we (a Pan Am 747) listened to the following exchange between Frankfurt ground control and a British Airways 747, call sign Speedbird 206: Speedbird 206: “Frankfurt, Speedbird 206 clear of active runway.” Ground: “Speedbird 206. Taxi to gate Alpha One-Seven.” The BA 747 pulled onto the main taxiway and…

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Aleksey Petrovich Maresyev, Fighter Pilot Who Defied Death

Aleksey Petrovich Maresyev, Fighter Pilot Who Defied Death

Aleksey Petrovich Maresyev was a Soviet fighter ace during the World War II. He was born in 1916 in the small city of Kamyshin on the banks of the Volga River. In 1937, he joined the Red Army and served in the border patrol aviation unit as a technician – but all he did, according to Maresyev, “was put the tail of the plane into the proper parking position.” A year and a half later he was sent to a pilot school in the city of Bataisk in the south…

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Spitfire – bringing beer kegs to the men in Normandy

Spitfire – bringing beer kegs to the men in Normandy

The Spitfire Mk IX was an evolved version of the Spitfire, with pylons under the wings for bombs or tanks. It was discovered that the bomb pylons could also be modified to carry beer kegs. According to pictures that can be found, various sizes of kegs were used. Whether the kegs could be jettisoned in case of emergency is unknown. If the Spitfire flew high enough, the cold air at altitude would even refresh the beer, making it ready for consumption upon arrival.

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